Volume 5, Issue 3, September 2020, Page: 66-75
Factors Affecting Children Ever Born Among Reproductive Aged Women in Ethiopia; Data from Edhs 2016
Zelalem Yitayal Melese, Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation, Debre Markos Referral Hospital, Debre Markos, Ethiopia
Likinaw Bewuket Zeleke, Department of Public Health, College of Health Science, Debre Markos University, Debre Markos, Ethiopia
Received: Oct. 1, 2019;       Accepted: Apr. 29, 2020;       Published: Sep. 10, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.wjph.20200503.14      View  24      Downloads  21
Abstract
There is a great concern about the levels, patterns and trends on fertility in sub-Saharan Africa. This pattern can be affected by fertility, mortality and migration. Fertility is the key determinants of population dynamics in once country. The main objective was to identify factors affecting children ever born in Ethiopia, from EDHS 2016 data. Secondary data was used from Ethiopian Demographic Health Survey (EDHS) which was collected from January 18, 2016 to June 27, 2016. The study population was women aged 15-49 years who were living in 2007 PHC selected enumeration areas in Ethiopia. Multilevel mixed effect negative binomial regression model was applied. Completing the primary level education (IRR=0.73, 95%CI=0.71-0.75), completed secondary level education (IRR=2.79 95%CI=1.69-4.60), place of residence (IRR=5.41, 95%CI=3.24-9.03), wealth index [poorer (IRR=0.71, 95%CI=0.52-0.98) and being richest (IRR=0.23, 95%CI=0.14-0.36)], gaining family planning information, using family planning service and occupation had effect on the number of children ever born. Religious types and women occupation category were also found to be significantly associated factor with the number of children ever born. Factors such as age, place of residence, religion, wealth index and educational level had significant effect on the number of children ever born in Ethiopia. The recommendation forwards the government to strengthened health service focusing on family planning service in Ethiopia. Family planning information communication and advocacy strengthened by the government. Improved family planning service awareness creation conducted on the religion aspects. The community participate in family planning health service, increase participation in education and listened information about family planning from different source. For the researcher, to do further researches to answered why these significant factor affect number of children ever born in Ethiopia.
Keywords
Children Ever Born, Mixed Effect Negative Binomial Regression, Reproductive Aged Women
To cite this article
Zelalem Yitayal Melese, Likinaw Bewuket Zeleke, Factors Affecting Children Ever Born Among Reproductive Aged Women in Ethiopia; Data from Edhs 2016, World Journal of Public Health. Vol. 5, No. 3, 2020, pp. 66-75. doi: 10.11648/j.wjph.20200503.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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