Volume 5, Issue 1, March 2020, Page: 12-16
Study of the Factors Associated with Llin Use in the Dahras at the Health District of Darou Mousty
Diop Cheikh Tacko, Faculty of Community Health at Alioune DIOP University, Bambey, Senegal
Diongue Mamadou, Faculty of Médecine, Pharmacy and Dentistry, Cheikh Anta DIOP University, Dakar, Senegal
Ka Ousseynou, Faculty of Community Health at Alioune DIOP University, Bambey, Senegal
Bop Martial Coly, Faculty of Community Health at Alioune DIOP University, Bambey, Senegal
Gueye Boubacar, Faculty of Community Health at Alioune DIOP University, Bambey, Senegal
Diagne Maty Camara, Faculty of Médecine, Pharmacy and Dentistry, Cheikh Anta DIOP University, Dakar, Senegal
Faye Adama, Faculty of Médecine, Pharmacy and Dentistry, Cheikh Anta DIOP University, Dakar, Senegal
Received: Dec. 26, 2019;       Accepted: Jan. 13, 2020;       Published: Feb. 4, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.wjph.20200501.12      View  96      Downloads  55
Abstract
The use of Long Lasting Impregnated Nets (LLIN) is still a problem in Senegal despite the efforts made by the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP) and the partners to ensure its availability. The main objective was to study the factors linked to the use of LLIN in the ‘dahras’ at the health district of Darou Mousty. A cross sectional, descriptive and analytical study on the talibés and the marabouts, was carried out at the health district of Darou Mousty from December 31, 2015 to January 4, 2016. Data were collected at the dahra level using a questionnaire for each target. The questionnaires were administered by individual interview after informed consent. The data covered socio-demographic and environmental characteristics, knowledge of malaria and the LLIN, as well as the usefulness of the latter and the use of other means of protection. The data were entered and analyzed with EPI INFO software version 3.5.3 with a 95% confidence interval. In total, 400 talibés and 40 marabouts were enlisted. The mean age of the talibés was 10.7 ± 2.6 years; the sex ratio M / F of 15.7. LLIN availability was 36.8%, LLIN utilization rate was 33.9%. The use of LLINs was statistically linked to the seniority of the talibés in the dahra (p = 0.03), the female sex (OR = 10; CI = [1.4- 25]), the place of sleeping (p = 0.0029), the information received on the LLIN by the talibé and the marabout with respectively (OR = 4.2; IC = [1.3 - 17.9]; OR = 3.6; IC = [2.1 - 6.3]), the ‘Ndiguel’ received from the marabout (OR = 1.8; CI = [1.1 - 3.3]), the talibés' knowledge of the usefulness of LLIN as a means of elimination of malaria (OR = 2.7; CI = [1.5 - 4.6]), knowledge of the talibés of the mode of transmission of malaria (OR = 1.8; CI = [1.0 - 3, 3]), the use of spirals and insecticides. The use of LLIN in the dahras requires strengthening the knowledge of the talibés and marabouts on malaria and LLIN, its mass and routine distribution and the support of all partners.
Keywords
Use, MILDA, Dahras, Darou Mousty, Senegal
To cite this article
Diop Cheikh Tacko, Diongue Mamadou, Ka Ousseynou, Bop Martial Coly, Gueye Boubacar, Diagne Maty Camara, Faye Adama, Study of the Factors Associated with Llin Use in the Dahras at the Health District of Darou Mousty, World Journal of Public Health. Vol. 5, No. 1, 2020, pp. 12-16. doi: 10.11648/j.wjph.20200501.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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